AcknowledgeRent can help reverse the effects of Land Dispossession on the Tribe.

Land Dispossession that began in 1797 created Systemic Barriers for the Fernandeño Tataviam people that are still impacting the Tribe today. 

+ Issue #1: Inhibiting Transmission of Traditional Ecological Knowledge

Financial hardships placed on non-federally recognized tribes mean that our Knowledge Keepers cannot fully transmit their knowledge to future generations of culture bearers. For example, the Fernandeño Tataviam people do not have permission to harvest sage or other sacred medicines in their own homelands without a permit costing upwards of $500.00. By supporting AcknowledgeRent you are in turn helping to reverse this barrier.

+ Issue #2: Inhibiting Protection of Cultural Sites

The Fernandeño Tataviam are the Tribal Cultural Resource experts of the land and provide labor, expertise, and knowledge to local and state agencies without compensation. The lack of access to a federal funding source costs the Tribe between $100,000 – $470,000 per year.

+ Issue #3: Inhibiting Protection of Children

Non-federally recognized tribes are not afforded the right to fully intervene in child welfare proceedings for their Tribal children as the federal Indian Child Welfare Act does not apply to them.  The Tribe is disproportionately affected and is losing their Tribal children, or future citizenry, in child welfare cases. The lack of funding to a federal funding source is costing the Tribe upwards of $100,00 – $450,000 annually.

AcknowledgeRent can help reverse the effects of Land Dispossession on the Tribe.

Land Dispossession that began in 1797 created Systemic Barriers for the Fernandeño Tataviam people that are still impacting the Tribe today. 

Financial hardships placed on non-federally recognized tribes mean that our Knowledge Keepers cannot fully transmit their knowledge to future generations of culture bearers. For example, the Fernandeño Tataviam people do not have permission to harvest sage or other sacred medicines in their own homelands without a permit costing upwards of $500.00.

The Fernandeño Tataviam are the Tribal Cultural Resource experts of the land and provide labor, expertise, and knowledge to local and state agencies without compensation. The lack of access to a federal funding source costs the Tribe between $100,000 – $470,000 per year.

Non-federally recognized tribes are not afforded the right to fully intervene in child welfare proceedings for their Tribal children as the federal Indian Child Welfare Act does not apply to them.  The Tribe is disproportionately affected and is losing their Tribal children, or future citizenry, in child welfare cases. The lack of funding to a federal funding source is costing the Tribe upwards of $100,00 – $450,000 annually.

AcknowledgeRent

Honor the culture, heritage, and legacy of the First Peoples of Los Angeles County. Help them thrive today and continue to share their invaluable culture with future generations.

Pay AcknowledgeRent